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20121001
20121031
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 180 (some duplicates have been removed)
and have witnessed history in the making. >> mexico, oh, yes. >> from presidential elections around the world to the most destructive natural disasters. maria has interviewed dictators, revolutionaries, world leaders, heads of state in latin america, and in the united states. she was among the first female journalists to report from the war torn streets of baghdad. george has covered five wars and right after the terrorists attack on september 11th he drove all the way from miami to new york to report on the tragedy firsthand. once he even asked for a vacation to cover the war in afghanistan. an assignment that at the time the network deemed too dangerous. he's had very public encounters with venezuela's hugo chavez, with former cuban dictator fidel castro. the president of bolivia stood up after only six minutes of questioning by him. both ramos and celines both moderated the first bilingual presidential debate. and most recently with the meet the candidates forum. but perhaps they are best known for defending the rights of immigrants by reporting on their plight and giving a voice
of mexico. oil leaked into the pristine crystal clear waters at an incredible rate of over 2 million gallons per day. the result was an admirer of the wasteland dress a stretch of sludge and lock that extended from louisiana and florida. killed nearly all the seabirds in the region, destroyed fisheries, rendered beaches hazardous and unusable and took a once vibrant region and turned it almost overnight into an empty ghost town. wait a minute. best of what happened and all. that is what the of burma to liberals said was born to happen to what they imagined could occur. thanks to the historical drama types and the media, that's what we all fought. that is what cnn anderson cooper state his entire show on. the because he cares one bit of what the people in that region. the only visits the region when there's something in it for anderson cooper. the people who run the restaurants and hotels, they are not anderson cooper stern the people. he would not be caught dead vacationing in panama city of a gulf shores it is what depended on it. he's more of a martha's vineyard southampton's of speech can
with mexico and the civil war was a small club and so grant drank himself out of the army. no one would have thought anything of it except that when the civil war began grant vaulted over dozens of officers senior to himself who took delight in spreading stories of grant's drinking. i tracked accounts of grant's drinking to the extent that i could and discovered on two occasions during the civil war he got drunk to the extent that he got drunk and went to bed and slept off and look up the next morning. he never got drunk at a time when being drunk impaired his ability to perform his responsibilities. he got drunk once during the siege of vicksburg when nothing was happening. he never got drunk when he was president. this is a story that has stuck with him in part because it is a label. you can put on somebody and it is hard to disprove. the part about grand being a butcher is something that even occurred to some of grant's fans during the civil war, the civil war shocked american sensibilities win the war began. no one understood how big the conflict was going to become. how many people woul
] >> see the final presidential debate monday live on c-span. watch and engage. next, the new mexico senate debate between martin heinrich and heather wilson. followed by a debate between carry herbert and challenger peter cooke. before president obama and mitt romney meat for the final debate on foreign policy and national security, we will take a look back at three debates from our archives. beginning saturday at 7:00 eastern, from 2004, president george w. bush and senator john carry at the university of miami. followed at 8:30 by ronald reagan and walter mondale in kansas city in the 1984. later george w. -- leader george bush and michael dukakis. u.s. senate candidates martin heinrich and heather wilson square off in their third debate and one of the closest of the country. this race was rated as leaning democratic. we picked this up right after the opening statements. this is at -- this is about an hour. >> we will go ahead and get started with the questions, but first i will introduce our panelists. our first one to the right is the friend is managing editor. next to him is a deputy
"fast and furious." thousands of additional guns found in mexico tracked back to the u.s. government. dozens of them believe to be used in violent crimes. >> who is going to pay for this? >> are military voters being treated fairly? >> it's really shocking, but most of the fingers point straight to the pentagon. >> mu afghanistan policy questions. >> terrorism has not gone away. it has increased. >> brit hume's analysis of the president's economic message. arapahoe county is largely suburban area southeast of denver, home to aerospace engineers and business managers and other professionals. there are some very affluent areas but for the most part it's the upper tier of the middle class. in 2008, barack obama carried this county by more than 35,000 votes. four years before that, george w. bush carried it by more than 9,000. the unemployment rate here is the national average. but it is below the state unemployment rate. another interesting stat about arapahoe county, 54% of the registered voters are women. one of the widest gender gaps in any county in colorado. which is why the obama
mexico. what's the latest, brian? >> reporter: john, at least a slight hold on the operation due to the weather. the winds at 700 to 800 feet up are a little higher than they are comfortable with, 17 to 18 miles per hour. they want it to calm down to 5 miles per hour. a slight hold on the weather. this still could come off in the window they allotted. that window begin b at 8:30 eastern time. our photojournalist can zoom into the capsule. you can see it at the end of that yellow crane. the balloon is next to it although you can't see it too visibly from the naked eye here but this is the feel where the balloon and capsule will be launched from there once it goes up it will take 2 1/2 to three hours to get up to the edge of space. felix baumgartner will step off the capsule, that whole dive will take 15 minutes and during that period he'll hopefully break the speed of sound about 690 miles per hour, john, a slight hold on this for now but hopefully this will come off later this morning. >> brian todd in roswell, new mexico. he's jumping from 23 miles high. jumping from 23 miles up
taught me about education. he often threatened to set me back to mexico if i can do well in school. >> is that it's very threat? >> it was because i really did believe him. >> you do not want to go back to mexico? >> no, i do not want to go back to mexico. and i wanted to make him proud. another thing i felt was because i begged him to bring me over here, i felt that i owed him out. i felt that i never wanted my father to say, i shouldn't have brought you. >> winner of the american book award and international latino book award. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. as we enter these last few months, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it is obama versus karl rove. he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months. here in new york are not going to see much of it. it will be spent in the battleground state. he has become king of the super pacs. $1.8 billion. to put that into perspective, in 2008, mccain had 375 million to spend. this is a factor of five. you're going to start seeing it come out now. the other thing that i
to john in new mexico. on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. it is a great honor to be on the c-span. i studied this report in geology actually last year at unm, and wrote a report on this report. they use words like unequivocally, climate change is real, they use words like absolutely the climate has been changed. 95% degree of certainty the climate has been changed. now, i drive a ford. and i like driving, like the freedom of driving. i do not want to be a hypocrite. because climate change is real. and you can ignore climate change, it will not go away. claiming it is an act of god will not change it. the top scientists have agreed that the ocean level is rising from melting ice around the world. climate change is real. host: here is the washington times editorial. regulationsomobiles will claim hundreds of lives by making vehicles less safe. the environmental protection agencies were on call shut down to water plants that produce af- caller: i do not know there is enough money to throw at the problems. it is very depressing to me. because i really think that there is going to
. it links more victims to the guns that got into mexico through that gun-running sting. >> they feel helpless. we interview one of them and they say who is going to pay for this. how we can carry on with such a thing that losing our sons. [ male announcer ] eligible for medicare? that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand what medicare is all about. and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. there's a range of plans to choose from, too. and they all travel with you. a
of 1997 when i was broke, broken, and on drugs. i was in mexico city where i had been lucky enough to go under a book contract from new york. i got an advance from a new york publishers to write a book. a dream come true. in mexico city i had crossed the deadline and didn't have a word written and i was broke and i called the only friend i could count on at that point because my life style led me to destroy a lot of personal relationships. i call the performance artist lives in the united states for many years and the solidarity network, art and politics in the 1980s and i said [speaking spanish] >> in the village of joshua tree, calif.. there is a set of circumstances that led her, she is from the tropics in central america. how did she wind up in the desert? everybody has a story in the desert how they got there. she said [speaking spanish] we will take care of you and give you a place to live. i arrive in the desert and one of the first things that i saw when i rented my little shack in the sand next to a sign that said next services, hundred miles, town of 29 palms, felt myself drive
so yet. >> you see more and more product and cheeses and medicinal products from mexico, much more interest in mexican chocolate, and you see the changing demographics, people demanding higher quality products. >> reporter: high-tend chocolates and cultural artifacts are so popular they are not just fetching top dollar, escondido has begun accepting pesos. >> more mexicans, more pesos. makes more sense of accepting them as a waive providing a public service of the people who come to the shop. >> reporter: mexicans have also taken manhattan, moving in where puerto ricans and dominicans once r bodegas and beauty shops. >> a lot of mexicans working in factories and hair salons, nail salons, everything, and, you know, from there they got better and some of them you see them now store owners, their own clothe stores, cell phone places, dealers, the same way somebody from mexico can come and do the same thing here. >> reporter: mexican births will soon outpace dominicans and puerto ricans in new york while more dominicans are leaving than arriving, not just moving up but moving out. >> m
mexico deserted. best known for leaping off skyscrapers. his mother and father were there showing signs of relief. you can only imagine what was going through their minds. it could help with future space exploration, and another way to safely escape should problems arrive. >> heather: what it could mean for our astronauts. thank you so much. >> gregg: i was skeptical that he would make it. he also had on deal with extreme weather through this whole thing in new mexico. they had to postpone the jump earlier this week because of the incredibly high winds there. meteorologist maria molina is watching the weather in the area. you were probably like me. we watched him sitting on the edge of the capsule, there is no way he can survive this. what an incredible feat. >> i can't take an elevator ride up to the top of the empire state building to think he is making such a huge jump. very brave. we do have very quiet conditions out across new mexico. we saw conditions improve with the weather. the reason why they were so unsettled because the storm system has moved east and bringing some travel is
fought and came up by their bootstraps from real deprivation and prejudice in mexico. i think it's a story he believed in, loved, but didn't feel he could talk about it, because it's about polygamy. >> let's take a look at the documentary. let's watch the way you handled it. >> the romneys had left the united states and went to mexico to avoid persecution, but it's also to pursue polygamy. >> with someone with a name like romney, and you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and their sacrifices and all they have done, that you feel like, well, it's my turn now, i've got to pick up the baton. >> it's an incredible history. he can't talk about it, because it involves polygamy. if the core of your personal is something that you can't talk about, because it's politically unacceptable, you will not be open with the people around you. >> is it possible in your research to handle something i'm concerned about, that's the view of american -- and the nothing of it, not that you can come to the come and make it your world, is there something in that religion along those lines? >> t
of michigan and the head of a car company. but he was born in mexico. had he been born of mexican parents, i'd have a better shot of winning this. >> actually mitt that is so true. the advantage is obvious. think of all of our hispanic-american presidents from george washington to george bush. >> that's part of the first video from actually.org which stars rosie perez. she's here next. hold on. ♪ [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! [ male announcer ] when your favorite foods fight you, fight back fast with tums smoothies. so fast and smooth, you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums [ male announcer ] tums smoothies. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the market, he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> rosie perez will be here next
mention. the diversification of our group in brazil we saw 26%. and mexico 12, another latino country 6%. that is all for% in the emerging market. we have roughly speaking half of our earnings. the rest diversified in countries such as the u.s., u.k. or germany. that means diversification is their kiosk pectin understanding under the resilience against the crisis. the fact of having a decentralized city area, means that if any crisis were to happen in one of the markets in which we are, we are able to have a firewall around this element of christ is, affecting by the investment in those countries but that the spillover impact. when we present to the bank of spain, we underline the bank of spain, as one of the great bear. they standalone independent said series. with the fact of having the banking operation with the largest branch of the world give us access to stable liquidity dependent on financial market. we find ourselves basically the banking obligation, another interesting feature. to the extent, it is likely about 100% of 170%, which is practically funding our assets and with a ve
are bee grijingly sticking with gulf of mexico begrudgingly sticking with obama, what he did in that first debate gave enough people, i think, even if it's not showing up in the polls yet, you know what? when the -- yeah, there's enough to go over there. i'm not going to stick with this guy. and i think if there's any surprise in the polls, i think it's going to swing in romney's favor. >> i'm starting to think that, too, mika. this is, again, we're getting so close. the president's still sitting at 47%, 48% in a lot of the nationally positives. you know, turnout can get you a percentage point. but if mitt romney keeps moving in the direction he's moving, that's different. if somebody has a cell phone on, you need to turn it off, steve rattner. >> i was just about to go to the financier's chart. >> steve rattner's always had a blackberry and it's never been a problem. >> little-known fact for kids at home if you want to be on "morning joe," at&t signals interfere with whatever we're wearing. >> but i'm getting brain waves from it. it's inspiration. >> the reason why. that's actually the fi
and 1.2 million refugees and they need clothes and everything. right now in mexico we've been where we have seen 50,000 people die in the last five years. we still live in a country where we have 10 million people in extreme poverty and we have illegal revjees that live here in the united states. so what would be your position on the moral obligation of the mexican government to their citizens to the war on drugs that has been going for the last five years? and i'd like to remember what the counselor of the u.n. on security said about repression which means more violence general rates more violence. so what would be your stand on the war in drugs in mexico? >> i have a feeling you're going to be a good lawyer. >> thank you. >> let me say that the drug issue is a big one in mexico and is becoming a big issue globally. last year there was a global commission on drugs headed by former president of brazil. i was on that commission. and the main point in the report was to decriminalation, not legalation, but deation because of the way laws are a plide. it doesn't work. it's got the prisons
he often threatened to send me back to mexico if i didn't do well in school. >> host: was that a scary threat? >> guest: it was a scary threat because they did believe him. i didn't want to go back to mexico and i wanted to make him proud. and then another thing i felt it was that because i baked him to bring me, i felt that i owed him that. i never wanted my father just say i shouldn't have right -- brought you. >> melanie kirkpatrick and joseph kim, one of the people profiled in her boat, "escape from north korea" to discuss the experiences of north koreans who fled the country. this book is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> did after nine welcome to the hudson institution new york book forum to celebrate the publication of "escape from north korea: the untold story of asia's underground railroad." by senior fellow, melanie kirkpatrick. i am ken weinstein, president and ceo of hudson institute and i also like to welcome our audience watching at home on booktv and i also want to especially thank our friends at c-span for covering today's event. there are a couple of g
in mexico, a secret. with univision's help we were able to something we knew, the serial numbers of guns to something we didn't a crime in mexico. to put a face on one of america's most embarrassing political scandals. a home covered in blood after gang members kill, 16, many teenagers at a birthday party in juarez mexico. many use in the massacre traced to "fast and furious". >> they are waiting for an answer. they want to know what happened and why they didn't stop these guns from leaving the united states and ending up in this, in these crimes. >> reporter: spanish language network univision and fox news obtained a list of 100,000 weapons recovered in mexico and compared of the serial numbers with the 2,000 guns sold in "fast and furious." nearly two dozen matched, connectings untold number of injuries and fatalities to the u.s. program. this woman lost two sons to "fast and furious" guns. >> they feel helpless. they don't know what to do. we interview one of them and they say, who is going to pay for this? >> reporter: it could be the u.s. government, should the family of border agen
in this election. the u.s. attorney by the name of david ecclesia said new mexico lasses job. in 2004, he was passed by rove with prosecuting what rove cause voter fraud. and to find people fraudulently registered to vote. he investigated for several instead it's not happening. it doesn't exist. as a result of that, he lost his job. the brennan center at nyu school of law has been thorough investigation at the idea of voter fraud. they say basically it doesn't exist. there've been 10 or 12 cases in the first 10 years of this century out of hundreds of millions of those spirits someone may register as mickey mouse, but mickey mouse never shows up in rows. but nevertheless, rove has initiated a cam pain and its allies in more than 30 states legislature of having votes requiring voter ids. now part of the democrats are saying this is a severe form of voter suppression. that is in many cases you find the elderly was given up their drivers licenses, but it's perfect years, the out they no longer have a government issued i.d., so they are not allowed to vote. you have minorities that is hispani
of congress you showed a scale model of a wall you said should be built on the southern border with mexico. do you feel like that is the way to go? king: what i said about that, people said we can't build a wall. well, it will get right down to the tipping kerr toys and show them because simply mental block how easy it is. i put together a model went down to the wall and here is how we do it. we could build a mile of this a day. that was the demonstration to put aside that argument that we couldn't do such a simple thing. 5500 miles of great wall of china. why would we think america couldn't build couple thousand. my position is this we don't have to build 2,000 miles of wall on the border. we build that till they stop simply going around the end that is the simple equation. >> wall details what? concrete barrier? brief explanation of that. king: pretty interesting when the president rid chruled a wall he was standing 600 feet from four walls, four fences and walls and two moats along the border but i described it as this. it is a type of concrete system you would slip form a foundational tren
of confusing. his father was born in mexico at some point to practice polygamy or something. he said it's too bad my father wasn't really a mexican. she was born in mexico but it's too bad he wasn't really a mexican. what was he trying to say by that? >> i think that he actually came out and said it a little bit later in the remarks i forget the words but that would be helping politically. my god it is easier to be a latino in this country than mitt romney. >> that's great. [laughter] >> he had the audacity to say that he would be doing better politically if he were latino. you did for awhile remind people that he had a sort of mexican heritage as they were trying to get the vote we've been hearing a lot about the romney election going on and i want to know your perspective on what really empowers the president, and that is the house and the scent to the consent. i have no comprehension on where the house is going. >> i think that -- people are being optimistic and saying it's possible that the democrats could take the house. i don't really expect that. when you see those it is usually kind o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 180 (some duplicates have been removed)